Friday, February 11, 2005

I caught this at the Center for Consumer Freedom:
"The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has formally admitted that its report blaming obesity for 400,000 deaths a year is fundamentally flawed. As the Los Angeles Times reports today: "A controversial government study that may have sharply overstated America's death toll from obesity was inappropriately released as a result of miscommunication, bureaucratic snafus and acquiescence from dissenting scientists." The CDC's admission comes seven months after the Center for Consumer Freedom first called into question the 400,000 deaths figure." ...

" ... The review committee report also acknowledges that the overall methodology used to calculate obesity-related deaths was flawed at its core:

'The paper published by Mokdad, et al., Actual causes of death in the United States 2000, has provoked significant controversy both inside and outside the agency. While there was at least one error in the calculations and both the presentation of the paper and limitations of the approach could have been expressed more clearly, the fundamental scientific problem centers around the limitations in both the data and the methodology in this area.'

"This paragraph is especially important because it contradicts a correction the CDC published in JAMA just last month. That correction admitted to the mathematical error referred to above, but then reaffirmed the underlying -- and now discredited -- methodology. ..."
Nanny gets a good kick in the a**. Life is good. Life will be even better if the fat Texas legislators who came up with this idea got a swift kick, too.


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